Do you Speak E-N-G-L-I-S-H?: Medicare Part D Language Access Report

Since its induction the Medicare Part D program has offered more heartache and headaches than it has coverage and care, where those hit the hardest have been seniors and families from the Limited English Proficient population (LEP). What our findings tell us is that among the LEP population the qualification needed in order to receive the medications and services that you are entitled to, is to know how to speak English.

Issue Brief: Do You Speak E-N-G-L-I-S-H? Medicare Part D Plans Fail Limited English Proficient Beneficiaries

Since its induction the Medicare Part D program has offered more heartache and headaches than it has coverage and care, where those hit the hardest have been seniors and families from the Limited English Proficient population. What our findings tell us is that among the LEP population the qualification needed in order to receive the medications and services that you are entitled to, is to know how to speak English.

Representing the New Majority Part II: A Status Report on the Diversity of the University of California Medical Faculty

This report serves as the second installment of the Representing the New Majority series, which examines the racial and ethnic diversity of the five-campus University of California medical school system. The first report assessed the racial and ethnic diversity of administrative and management career staff members on the UC Davis, Irvine, Los Angeles, San Diego, and San Francisco medical school campuses. This report focuses on the racial and ethnic diversity of tenure-track faculty at each medical school campus. The final re p o rt will analyze the racial and ethnic diversity of the medical student body.

Pharmaceutical Companies Behind Closed Doors: Corporate Responsibility Gone Awry

As a consequence of artificial price inflation and excessive marketing, the U.S. pharmaceutical industry generated an all-time high $215 billion in revenue last year, making it the most profitable industry in the world. This report examines what the ten highest grossing pharmaceutical companies have done with their profits and power across three corporate practice areas; executive compensation, philanthropic giving, and marketing and advertising.

Toward Fair Cures: Diversity Policies in Stem Cell Research

What if a cure existed for cancer, diabetes, heart disease, blindness, HIV/AIDS, and many other debilitating diseases and illnesses? Adapted into state law in the 2004, the California Stem Cell Research and Cures Act directs $3 billion of state monies toward stem cell research to make such cures a reality. Also, the investment into biotech is predicted to create up to 22,000 jobs on average a year. To facilitate active and informed participation, this brief raises important policy issues related to stem cell research such as: What stake do diverse communities have in California’s stem cell research program? What is the medical potential of stem cells? What policy examples can communities set to guarantee fairness in the future?

Towards Fair Cures: Economic Development and Stem Cell Research

What if a cure existed for cancer, diabetes, heart disease, blindness, HIV/AIDS, and many other debilitating diseases and illnesses? Adapted into state law in the 2004, the California Stem Cell Research and Cures Act directs $3 billion of state monies toward stem cell research to make such cures a reality. Also, the investment into biotech is predicted to create up to 22,000 jobs on average a year.To facilitate active and informed participation, this brief raises important policy issues related to stem cell research such as: Who will receive the $3 billion in the form of grants and jobs? How will the state reap the economic benefits promised by the California Stem Cell Research and Cures Act? How might the public and private industry create win-win situations to mutually profit from stem cell research?

Social Benefits and Private Investments: The Private Sector’s Role in Increasing Diversity in the Health Workforce

On April 20, 2007, The Greenlining Institute, the Bay Area Coalition
to Increase Diversity in the Health Workforce, Pacific Public Health
Training Center, UC Berkeley Center for Public Health Practice,
and the University of California Office of the President, California
Program on Access to Care co-sponsored Checking the
Pulse: An Initiative to Increase Diversity in California’s Health
Workforce in Los Angeles.

Creating a Philanthropic Sector That Is More Responsive to the Needs of Diverse Communities

Today’s news is inundated with stories of social and economic hardships that low- and middle-class Americans face, from the disheartening state of the country’s health care and public education systems, to the increasing disparity between the have’s and have not’s. In the midst of this all, many of the estimated 1.8 million1 tax-exempt organizations including foundations, public charities and other 501(c) groups seek to meet the needs of the country’s diverse populations and change those systems that seem programmed to perpetuate these problems.

The Green Solution for People of Color: How the Advent of Green Business Can Bring Two Movements Together

A deep divide presently characterizes two key progressive movements: environmental groups and civil rights advocates. The rapidly-growing “green industry” – or business that contributes to an equitable and ecologically sustainable economy – could change all this.
Historically, mainstream environmental organizations have ignored the unique issues facing low-income and minority communities. While well-intentioned environmentalists might sometimes try to recruit low-income and minority communities to their cause, rarely do they reciprocate by acknowledging the daily issues faced by minority communities like housing, crime, poverty, and low educational attainment.